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    1923 - 1936

    TELEFUNKEN GOES COMMERCIAL

    On April 17, 1904, the company changed its name to "Telefunken, Gesellschaft für drahtlose Telegraphie", and on July 26, 1932 Telefunkenplatte GmbH officially began its commercial activity with registered capital of 100,000 Reichsmarks. 

     

    The station in the Telefunken building, Tempelhofer Ufer 9 in Berlin, began broadcasting concerts regularly two and a half months before the official start of the "Deutsche Rundfunkverkehr".  The world tour of the Graf Zeppelin airship in 1929 got off the ground by using Telefunken transmitters, receivers and directional equipment exclusively.  Also, on October 31, 1928, during the 5th Grand German Radio Exhibition in Berlin, Telefunken presented a television set with the Karolus-Telefunken system, a scanning process of film images through a Mechau projector with a Nipkow disk, in public for the first time. 

    MEET TELEFUNKEN'S MAD SCIENTISTS

    Dr. Hans Bredow  is considered to be the "Father of Broadcasting". He was employed at Telefunken from 1904 to 1919 as a Project Manager, and later as Managing Director.

     

    Prof. Dr. Walter Bruch developed the very first electronic television camera, with which he participated in the live broadcast of the Olympic Summer Games in Berlin in 1936. He also earned international fame by inventing the PAL color television system. He joined Telefunken's Television and Physical Research Department in 1935. 

     

    These two innovators thought out of the "TV box" and helped shape and make Telefunken what it is today.

     

    WELCOME TO RADIO TELEFUNKEN

    The German radio station in Zeesen near Königswusterhausen (8 kW shortwave transmitter) was built by Telefunken and was officially placed in service on August 28, 1929. The Mühlacker radio station (60 kW output) was handed over on December 20, 1930. Telefunken is now in, and on, the air.

     

     

     

     

     

    TELEFUNKEN GOES FOR THE GOLD, SILVER AND BRONZE

    In 1935, Telefunken equipped the Olympic Stadium, the Maifeld and the Dietrich-Eckhardt Stage with electrical-acoustic equipment for the Olympics. On August 1, 1936 at the XI Olympic Summer Games in Berlin, an electronic television camera, known as the Ikonoskop, was used for the first time for a direct transmission. Again, another Telefunken first. And second. And third